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This weekend I saw Under the Skin, Enemy and Prisoners. I attempted to watch another film but gave up because I was fully sated.

Under the Skin and Prisoners are excellent independent films. The structure, subject matter - even the looks of the films are singular enough to clue in the viewer that anything goes. It is a freeing sensation and most likely these films will annoy more than they will entertain. Which is a shame.  Each has its merits as well as its shortcomings but their existence, that they were made at all, is reassuring. In this time when directors are opting out of filmmaking, when critics and Internet commentators bemoan the death of the auteur and original films, I take comfort in proof to the contrary. In fact a quick look at all of the films A24 is involved with is enough to soften even the toughest of cynics -good things are going on. 

The final film I watched was Prisoners. I was hesitant due to the subject of the film, now that I have young children of my own such storylines are of little interest to me for entertainment purposes. After seeing Enemy I felt I could trust the director and I am happy to report I was not wrong. The film is perfectly executed, immaculately lit and filled with wonderful performances. This may in fact be the performance of Hugh Jackman’s career. You hardly notice how little the other, exceptional, actors are given to do because Prisoners truly is Mr. Jackman’s film. 

Next up is Incendies, a film I have been putting off seeing despite hearing wonderful things about. Denis Villeneuve you have a new admirer. Thank you for the wonderful films.

This weekend I saw Under the Skin, Enemy and Prisoners. I attempted to watch another film but gave up because I was fully sated.

Under the Skin and Prisoners are excellent independent films. The structure, subject matter - even the looks of the films are singular enough to clue in the viewer that anything goes. It is a freeing sensation and most likely these films will annoy more than they will entertain. Which is a shame. Each has its merits as well as its shortcomings but their existence, that they were made at all, is reassuring. In this time when directors are opting out of filmmaking, when critics and Internet commentators bemoan the death of the auteur and original films, I take comfort in proof to the contrary. In fact a quick look at all of the films A24 is involved with is enough to soften even the toughest of cynics -good things are going on.

The final film I watched was Prisoners. I was hesitant due to the subject of the film, now that I have young children of my own such storylines are of little interest to me for entertainment purposes. After seeing Enemy I felt I could trust the director and I am happy to report I was not wrong. The film is perfectly executed, immaculately lit and filled with wonderful performances. This may in fact be the performance of Hugh Jackman’s career. You hardly notice how little the other, exceptional, actors are given to do because Prisoners truly is Mr. Jackman’s film.

Next up is Incendies, a film I have been putting off seeing despite hearing wonderful things about. Denis Villeneuve you have a new admirer. Thank you for the wonderful films.

Photoset

amazingcinematography:

Prisoners (2013)

Directed by: Denis Villeneuve
Cinematography: Roger Deakins BSC, ASC
Cameras: Arri Alexa Plus & Studio, Zeiss Master Primes 
Format: Digital (ARRIRAW)
Mode: Spherical
Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1

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Let me start by saying this: Michael Moore has annoyed me far more than he has ever informed or educated me. I no longer watch his films. The reason why I stopped watching is that I grew tired of him and his rather questionable stance regarding the truth.  

A recent talk he gave is online at Indiewire and from a filmmaking perspective it is fantastic. This is easily the best speech I have ever read regarding documentary filmmaking. Anyone interested in any form of filmmaking should read this, even if you loathe the man who gave it. 

http://www.indiewire.com/article/michael-moores-13-rules-for-making-documentary-films-20140910

Let me start by saying this: Michael Moore has annoyed me far more than he has ever informed or educated me. I no longer watch his films. The reason why I stopped watching is that I grew tired of him and his rather questionable stance regarding the truth.

A recent talk he gave is online at Indiewire and from a filmmaking perspective it is fantastic. This is easily the best speech I have ever read regarding documentary filmmaking. Anyone interested in any form of filmmaking should read this, even if you loathe the man who gave it.

http://www.indiewire.com/article/michael-moores-13-rules-for-making-documentary-films-20140910

Quote
"Digital communities offer both studios and independents a way to economically utilize both test screenings and word of mouth screenings. The internet allows us to target specific demographics as well as monitor their behavior while viewing (did they pause? where? and for how long?). Geo-blocking allows for specific regions to be focused on. When the digital community already has a built in video player a screening can easily be accommodated."

Ted Hope

The indie film vet wants all indie filmmakers to consider digital premieres prior to theatrical release…and we’re inclined to agree! 

(via futureoffilm)

If you don’t find these reasons insidious then you aren’t paying attention.

(via futureoffilm)

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Finally saw Noah. Such a beautiful film. As always Darren Aronofsky delivers an interesting, layered film that implies but rarely tells the audience what to the think. When people moan about the lack of films made for adults or when the claim that personal, independent films are not being made -try and remember filmmakers like Mr. Aronofsky and films like Noah.

Finally saw Noah. Such a beautiful film. As always Darren Aronofsky delivers an interesting, layered film that implies but rarely tells the audience what to the think. When people moan about the lack of films made for adults or when the claim that personal, independent films are not being made -try and remember filmmakers like Mr. Aronofsky and films like Noah.

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natgeofound:

The Statue of Liberty hails dawn over New York Harbor in 1978.Photograph by David Alan Harvey, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

The Statue of Liberty hails dawn over New York Harbor in 1978.Photograph by David Alan Harvey, National Geographic Creative

Link

newyorker:

Excerpts from Sasha Frere-Jones’s track-by-track guide to the new U2 album:

“Every Breaking Wave”: That recursive U2 trick where they sound like one of the hundred bands who ripped them off. I think this one might be by Snow Patrol. Bono’s vocals sounds like they’re ten feet away from…

Early today I thought, “Who is this Sasha Frere-Jones person?” Then I come across this nonsense - Nowhere near as good as “Drunk In Love.” (Comparing a song by U2 to one by Beyoncé). I could spend the next three days writing about how ridiculous comparing the rock group and the pop singer is but the truth is: if I have to do so then I have already lost.

(Source: newyorker.com)

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rollingstone:

Surprise! U2 just released a new album!
Quote
"Lights can be friendly with each other or antagonize each other, or, what is worse, duplicate each other’s function, and then the rays are no longer bearers of beauty, but foster confusion. Learn to photograph by beginning with one light; if that one light is mastered, all other lights are mastered as well."

http://extension765.com/sdr/14-my-favorite-von#sthash.c2PGOzfA.dpuf

Text

"In this case, Farbman says, multiple takes meant the actor’s coarse beard hair was chafing the actress’ skin."

Reason number 11,234,643 why I could never be an actor. When fifty takes is normal for a scene I can’t help but think you don’t know what you want.

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"While most people are repulsed by the idea, when we spend money on saving and prolonging some lives, we are making judgments about how much those lives (and others that we don’t try as hard to save) are worth."

Michael Specter on the A.L.S. Ice-Bucket Challenge. (via newyorker)

Very happy to read this. You certainly get the sense that the issue is not as important as being part of the fad.

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

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(Source: culturecheese)

Quote
"You get a little buzz when you see somebody’s retweeted you, or commented on you, or talked about you on social media. Then that buzz goes away, and you want a little more the next time, so you start checking your phone more, and you become addicted to that kind of attention, and you mistake it for presence in the world, and you can live this strange double life, which Jon [Domhnall Gleeson] lives. His social-media avatar is a very different creature than the person we see so much of in the film. It felt like it was timely, because I don’t think that issue of social-media self-presentation has really found its way into mainstream film yet."

Frank director Lenny Abrahamson talks about his film’s approach to social media, rock ‘n’ roll, mental illness, and the intersection of all three. Read the full interview.  (via thedissolve)

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arte-silencio:

Inspiration… #thedianasblog #DianaPhotoApp #DianaPhoto #DoubleExposure #Diana #photoApp #myEdit #like #camera #vintage #art #insta #instaphoto #enlightened #leaf #artbynwpb #inspiration

arte-silencio:

Inspiration… #thedianasblog #DianaPhotoApp #DianaPhoto #DoubleExposure #Diana #photoApp #myEdit #like #camera #vintage #art #insta #instaphoto #enlightened #leaf #artbynwpb #inspiration

(via thedianasblog)

Text

Amazon Vs. Hachette: What Would Orwell Think?

newyorker:

George Packer on Amazon’s dispute with Hachette:

“Like Orwell, we ought to be able to hold in our heads the complex idea that what is good for readers might ultimately be bad for writers. After all, Amazon is not a literary nonprofit; it’s a corporate giant that wants to sell everything to everyone.”

Photograph: 1exposure/eyevine/Redux

Fantastic. So well put.

(Source: newyorker.com)